ga-wdi-boston/git #7

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jrhorn424 opened this Issue Jan 12, 2016 · 19 comments

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jrhorn424 commented Jan 12, 2016

Summary

Using Git especially in the context of how we use them in the class.

Prerequisites

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jrhorn424 commented Jan 19, 2016

85 minutes actual

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jrhorn424 commented Jan 19, 2016

Previous actual was incorrect. I mistakenly lumped the time together with ga-wdi-boston/git-github-fork.

Actual was 65 minutes.

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RealWeeks commented Mar 21, 2016

70 minutes.

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jrhorn424 commented May 3, 2016

70 minutes is practically a 2 actual

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MicFin commented Mar 21, 2017

2 actual.
Scheduled: 1-2pm
Actual: 1-3pm (with two 10min breaks)

Spent more time explaining what version control and git are, why we use them, what they are similar to that we already know. There were MANY questions from the developers since some of them have experience with LM software that is similar. I was able to avoid most rabbit holes but still had to field questions and put them in perspective.

We made up to and including Stage 3 of http://learngitbranching.js.org/ and then encouraged them to do the rest on their own.

There was time spent drawing diagrams on the white board, potentially it would save time to have another consultant draw while the other presents. Also, having diagrams in the repository as image files or in the README could have been useful for saving time as well.

I think spending additional time on what git is was time well spent with this cohort and thanks to a well planned calendar we had the time available.

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MicFin commented Mar 28, 2017

2 actual. 120minutes.
Scheduled: 12-1pm, lunch, 2-2:30
Actual: 1230-1pm, lunch, 2-3:30

Talk before this went late so we only had 30minutes to start before lunch. Similar delivery as previous though. Still spent more time explaining What and Why about Git and Github using Dropbox and Google Drive as examples.

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bengitscode commented Jun 14, 2017

2 actual 120 minutes
Scheduled: 2:30- 3:30
Actual: 1:30 - 3:45

2 ten minute breaks

1.5 actual 90 mins
Scheduled: 1-2
Actual: 11:15 - 12 (break for lunch) 1-1:30
1 five minute break, 2 ten minute breaks

UnixCLI ran very short and ended up dropping the git knowledge much earlier.

I made a solid diagram that I think covered upstream well, but I didn't dig into it too much.

I made the mistake of going a little deeper than I should -- this should cover git status, adding, committing and only in the simplest forms.

I think my enthusiasm for git made up for not using diagrams more heavily, but the one I did use seemed to work really well.

Everyone completed the adding your on remote section. https://git.generalassemb.ly/ga-wdi-boston/git-github#adding-your-own-remote.

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bengitscode commented Jul 18, 2017

1.5 actual 80 minutes with one break.

used wallace and grommit image for explaining staging area and commits.
Went smoother than last time, I think because I focused strictly on the basic git objectives and bit my tongue more on sharing cool git things.

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tvlangley commented Mar 15, 2018

120min. 2 actual. Flow may have been a bit slow; also, spent too much time on the Lab: Crafting A Commit.

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ArjunRayGA commented Jun 4, 2018

100 min. 2 actual.

Mostly went smoothly, showed them some additional tricks with git and drew out the standard git diagram to show them how commit history diverges at a branch point. Perhaps "never nest repositories" is a little abstract for the students to understand unless they see an example of what happens when they do so, namely on GitHub.

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ArjunRayGA commented Oct 15, 2018

3 actual. 2 hours and 20 min.

Went smoothly except we had issues with the wifi so people were in different states of ssh capability dependent on whether they were on the authenticated wifi, restricted wifi, or a mobile hotspot. Crafting a Commit lab is a little weird because they just did their first commit which usually doesn't have a ton of extra information in the message besides first commit and therefore isn't a great catalyst for imagining a stellar commit message.

Used and AWS Workspace (remote VM GUI interface) with Windows 10 post-installfest to demo how WSL users use nano to commit instead of atom (nano is what is set up for committing for WSL users during installfest). We should consider switching everyone over to nano as it's much faster than waiting for atom to open and does not suffer from the occasional "added commit message tab to already opened Atom window, closing commit message doesn't process the commit" issue that occurs with Atom.

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jmeade11 commented Jun 11, 2019

110 mins. planned / 120 mins. with 1 break.

It went fine, but as with the last time (despite numerous times saying it and explaining what I meant) two people still made a nested folder. I like this lesson and like delivering it, but I think there are a couple of things that could be improved. In particular, we should make sure that we provide the MAC and LINUX commands in the lesson. I know nothing about Linux or Windows keyboards at all and feel badly telling folks, "sorry, no, I have no idea what you should use". Also, I added merging at the end of the lesson. It should be taught in this lesson, otherwise they won't learn about it until unit 3.

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